Playing the triangle: Cosmopolitanism, Cultural Capital and Social Capital as intersecting scholarly discourses about social inclusion and marginalisation in Australian public policy debates

UTS ePress
Publication Type:
Journal Article
Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 2011, 3 (3), pp. 68 - 91
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A constant challenge for scholarly research relates to its impact on and integration into public policy. Where the policy issues are `wicked, as are those concerning intercultural relations and social cohesion, social science research often becomes implicated in real-world problem solving which occurs within everyday political manoeuvring. This paper takes three empirical problems, and three conceptual approaches, and explores what happens when they are pressed together. In particular the paper explores how together they can enhance the social value of the concept of `social inclusion. Cosmopolitanism has a myriad of possible definitions, but is perhaps best addressed in anthropological fashion, by trying to capture the space formed by its presumptive antagonists: nationalism, prejudice, localism, parochialism, and `rootedness (as in `rootless cosmopolitan).
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