Accounting for intangible investments

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dc.contributor.author Wyatt, A
dc.contributor.author Abernethy, M
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:54:01Z
dc.date.issued 2008-01
dc.identifier.citation Australian Accounting Review, 2008, 18 (2), pp. 95 - 107
dc.identifier.issn 1035-6908
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/10087
dc.description.abstract The traditional categorisation of expenditures evident in many firms' charts of accounts and financial statements does not identify and measure expenditures on intangible investment separately from tangible investment and operating expenditures. This contrasts with the accounting for tangible investment, which separately accounts for all expenditures as assets unless the future benefits are consumed in a single accounting period. Further, in searching for better ways to account for intangibles, regulators and researchers have focused on the accounting choice problem relating to the existence and recognisability of intangible assets. In this paper, we argue that identifying and separately reporting the expenditures on intangible investment is the logical first step in accounting for intangible investments. Learning about the firm's categories of value driving (and sometimes potentially value destroying) expenditures has important implications for understanding aspects of the value chain, performance measurement, valuation, corporate governance and the external audit. There are significant expenditures invested in intangibles including resources such as human capital, the long-term customer base, product and process related technologies, information technology, and brands and intellectual property.1 To date, the traditional categorisation of expenditures evident in many firms' charts of accounts and the financial statements does not identify and measure expenditures on these intangibles separately from expenditures on tangible investment and current production (operating expenditures).2 This contrasts with the accounting for tangible investment, which separately accounts for all expenditures not consumed in a single accounting period as assets. In searching for better ways to account for intangibles, regulators and researchers have focused on the accounting choice problem relating to the existence and recognisability of intangible assets.
dc.publisher CPA Australia
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1111/j.1835-2561.2008.0012.x
dc.title Accounting for intangible investments
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent Australian Accounting Review
dc.journal.volume 2
dc.journal.volume 18
dc.journal.number 2 en_US
dc.publocation Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 95 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 107 en_US
dc.cauo.name BUS.School of Accounting en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 150103 Financial Accounting
dc.personcode 100288
dc.personcode 999569
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Financial Accounting en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords en_US
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Business
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Business/School of Accounting
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Corporate Governance
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10


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