Makeover Culture's Dark Side: Breasts, Death and Lolo Ferrari

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dc.contributor.author Jones, MR
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:55:39Z
dc.date.issued 2008-01
dc.identifier.citation Body & Society, 2008, 14 (1), pp. 89 - 104
dc.identifier.issn 1357-034X
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/10338
dc.description.abstract The word 'makeover' is dotted through popular culture and is applied to a range of activities including home renovation, gardening, urban renewal and business invigoration. Makeover culture is part of a sociocultural paradigm that values endless improving, renovating and rejuvenating. Makeover citizens enact urgent and never-ending renovations of the self. Cosmetic surgery is both symptom and manufacturer of makeover culture. It is indicative and constitutive of an arena in which ideal objects and subjects are always being improved, and in which everything including the body is always ripe for enhancement. This article focuses on the 1990s French pornography star, Lolo Ferrari. Two aspects of Ferrari's famous cosmetic surgery are examined. They indicate a darker side of makeover culture one that is less about lifestyle and surface gloss and more about pornography, death and unconsciousness. The first is her breasts, which I examine in relation to gigantism and normalized notions of femininity, and as symbols of the transition from girl to woman. The second is Ferrari' s striking declaration that she loved being under anaesthetic. I delve into this notion to discuss how immobility, stasis, decay and mortality are crucial parts of makeover culture's promises of transformation. © 2008 Sage Publications.
dc.publisher Sage
dc.relation.hasversion Accepted manuscript version en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1177/1357034X07087532
dc.title Makeover Culture's Dark Side: Breasts, Death and Lolo Ferrari
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent Body & Society
dc.journal.volume 1
dc.journal.volume 14
dc.journal.number 1 en_US
dc.publocation UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 89 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 104 en_US
dc.cauo.name DVCTLE.Institute for Interactive Media and Learning en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 2002 Cultural Studies
dc.personcode 014099
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Cultural Studies en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Body modification; Cosmetic surgery; Femininity; Gigantism; Myth; Plastic surgery en_US
dc.description.keywords Body modification
dc.description.keywords Cosmetic surgery
dc.description.keywords Femininity
dc.description.keywords Gigantism
dc.description.keywords Myth
dc.description.keywords Plastic surgery
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - TransForming Cultures
utslib.copyright.status Open Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:23:47.074767+10
utslib.collection.history Uncategorised (ID: 363)
utslib.collection.history General (ID: 2)


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