Russians from China: Migrations and Identity

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dc.contributor.author Moustafine, M
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:57:40Z
dc.date.issued 2010-01
dc.identifier.citation The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations, 2010, 9 (6), pp. 173 - 185
dc.identifier.issn 1447-9532
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/10601
dc.description.abstract In the first half of the 20th century, sizeable Russian communities lived in a number of Chinese cities, including Harbin, Shanghai and Tientsin. The largest and most diverse of these was the community that grew up around Harbin in north China. By the mid 1920s, Harbin was home to one of the largest Russian diaspora communities in the world, with over 120,000 Russians and other nationalities from the former Tsarist Empire. Moreover, many Russians in Shanghai and Tientsin had links to Harbin, as their first place of domicile in China. By the late 1950s, political transformations in China had driven almost all these people elsewhere. But for many of them, their roots in China became a key aspect of their identity in emigration in their new diasporas. This paper explores the background to this unique community and the geo-political forces underpinning the various waves of migration of Russians into and out of Harbin. It analyses the complex issues of identity and citizenship Russians faced while living in Harbin, their fates determined at various points in time by the dominance of three powers Russia, China and Japan. Drawing on the experience of my own family, whose life in Harbin and Manchuria spanned four generations over fifty years, it touches on the rich ethnic and cultural mix that lay beneath the surface of Russian Harbin, with particular reference to the Jewish community that once thrived there. Finally, it examines how the `Harbintsy perceive their identity in emigration and the recent changes in attitude towards them of the Chinese authorities.
dc.publisher Common Ground
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1891/1062-8061.22.1.13
dc.title Russians from China: Migrations and Identity
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent The International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations
dc.journal.volume 6
dc.journal.volume 9
dc.journal.number 6 en_US
dc.publocation Melbourne, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 173 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 185 en_US
dc.cauo.name FASS.Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 1607 Social Work
dc.personcode 10661534
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Social Work en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Russian, China, Harbin, Manchuria, Japan, Jews, Diversity, Migration, Identity, Diaspora, Cosmopolitan, Multicultural en_US
dc.description.keywords Russian, China, Harbin, Manchuria, Japan, Jews, Diversity, Migration, Identity, Diaspora, Cosmopolitan, Multicultural
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
utslib.copyright.status Open Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:23:47.074767+10
utslib.collection.history General (ID: 2)


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