Je regrette: Towards marshalling remorse in knowledge transfer

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dc.contributor.author Kouzmin, A
dc.contributor.author Sankaran, S
dc.contributor.author Hase, S
dc.contributor.author Kakabadse, N
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-20T13:02:08Z
dc.date.issued 2006-01
dc.identifier.citation International Journal of Knowledge Culture and Change Management, 2006, 5 (1), pp. 89 - 94
dc.identifier.issn 1447-9524
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/1077
dc.description.abstract In the manifold excesses of current Anglo-American managerial praxis, from short-term time horizons, grossly distorted expressions of managerial prerogatives and remuneration rationales and a calculated brutality far in excess of any Human Relations sensitivity, the need to inflate shareholder perceptions of the bottom line has led to a managerial immorality that staggers many ethical and stakeholders boundaries. Post Enron, Tyco and others, can much change? Are all senior managers doomed to the moral/ethical vacuum of the bottom line? With remuneration packages deliberately focused around an economic-rationalist brutality, what reflective space, what discourse allows and enables moments of remorse/regret and accommodates the inevitable need for personal accountability and attempts at restitution? Is it merely recourse to recalcitrant legal/governance codes that provides for accounting for managerial incompetence and ideologized greed? How will management discourse remember the current regressive nature of managerial behaviour? How will Knowledge Management, in full flight with rhetoric about the importance of Tacit Knowledge, deal with organizational incompetence?
dc.publisher Common Ground Publishing
dc.rights Copyright belongs to Common Ground Publishing. Must ask Publisher (Common Ground) permission to reproduce this article.
dc.title Je regrette: Towards marshalling remorse in knowledge transfer
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent International Journal of Knowledge Culture and Change Management
dc.journal.volume 1
dc.journal.volume 5
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.journal.number 1 en_US
dc.publocation Melbourne, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 89 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 94 en_US
dc.cauo.name DAB.School of Built Environment en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 1503 Business and Management
dc.personcode 999248
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Business and Management en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.description.keywords cultural audits, dialectical debate, downsizing, economic rationalism, emotionality, managerialism, organizational incompetence, psychological contracts, regret, remorse, social capital, trust, vulnerability audits en_US
dc.description.keywords cultural audits, dialectical debate, downsizing, economic rationalism, emotionality, managerialism, organizational incompetence, psychological contracts, regret, remorse, social capital, trust, vulnerability audits
dc.description.keywords cultural audits, dialectical debate, downsizing, economic rationalism, emotionality, managerialism, organizational incompetence, psychological contracts, regret, remorse, social capital, trust, vulnerability audits
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building/School of Built Environment
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Contemporary Design Practice
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Management and Organisation Studies
utslib.copyright.status Open Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:23:47.074767+10


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