Boron contents and solubility in Australian fly ashes and its uptake by canola (Brassica napus L.) from the ash-amended soils

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dc.contributor.author Manoharan, V
dc.contributor.author Yunusa, IAM
dc.contributor.author Loganathan, P
dc.contributor.author Lawrie, R
dc.contributor.author Murray, BR
dc.contributor.author Skilbeck, CG
dc.contributor.author Eamus, D
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-07T06:21:34Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Australian Journal of Soil Research, 2010, 48 (5), pp. 480 - 487
dc.identifier.citation Australian Journal of Soil Research, 2010, 48 (5), pp. 480 - 487
dc.identifier.issn 0004-9573
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/13424
dc.description.abstract Phytotoxicity due to excessive boron (B) uptake by plants impedes routine agronomic utilisation of coal fly ash. We assessed 11 fly ashes (pH 3.1410.77) having total B content (Bt) of 12136mg/kg, of which 2030% was hot water soluble (Bs) in the acidic ashes (pH 5) and 510% in the alkaline ashes, for their potential to supply B to plants and their risk associated with phytotoxicity. We found the Bs/Bt to be negatively correlated (R2≤0.63, N≤11) with ash pH. We conducted two pot trials in which canola was grown in soils amended with fly ash. In the first trial, an alkaline fly ash (Bt 66mg/kg) was incorporated at 5 rates of up to 625Mg/ha into the top 50mm of 2 acidic soils in 0.30-m-long intact cores, and sown with canola. Boron concentration in leaves at flowering reached the phytotoxic threshold, and both plant growth and seed yield were reduced, only at 625Mg/ha. In the second trial, 4 fly ashes (pH 3.2910.77, Bt 12127mg/kg) were incorporated at 4 rates of up to 108Mg/ha into the top 0.10m of 2 acidic soils in 1.0-m-long intact cores and then sown with canola. Ashes with highest Bt, when applied at 108Mg/ha, increased B concentration in the topsoil only. Of the 2 ashes with the highest B t, only that which produced low soil pH and applied at 108Mg/ha increased B concentration in the shoot, but was still below phytotoxic threshold. The results suggest that B derived from these ashes may not cause phytotoxicity and excessive soil B accumulation if the ashes are applied at modest rates (36Mg/ha) to the topsoil layers. © 2010 CSIRO.
dc.description.abstract Phytotoxicity due to excessive boron (B) uptake by plants impedes routine agronomic utilisation of coal fly ash. We assessed 11 fly ashes (pH 3.1410.77) having total B content (Bt) of 12136mg/kg, of which 2030% was hot water soluble (Bs) in the acidic ashes (pH 5) and 510% in the alkaline ashes, for their potential to supply B to plants and their risk associated with phytotoxicity. We found the Bs/Bt to be negatively correlated (R2≤0.63, N≤11) with ash pH. We conducted two pot trials in which canola was grown in soils amended with fly ash. In the first trial, an alkaline fly ash (Bt 66mg/kg) was incorporated at 5 rates of up to 625Mg/ha into the top 50mm of 2 acidic soils in 0.30-m-long intact cores, and sown with canola. Boron concentration in leaves at flowering reached the phytotoxic threshold, and both plant growth and seed yield were reduced, only at 625Mg/ha. In the second trial, 4 fly ashes (pH 3.2910.77, Bt 12127mg/kg) were incorporated at 4 rates of up to 108Mg/ha into the top 0.10m of 2 acidic soils in 1.0-m-long intact cores and then sown with canola. Ashes with highest Bt, when applied at 108Mg/ha, increased B concentration in the topsoil only. Of the 2 ashes with the highest B t, only that which produced low soil pH and applied at 108Mg/ha increased B concentration in the shoot, but was still below phytotoxic threshold. The results suggest that B derived from these ashes may not cause phytotoxicity and excessive soil B accumulation if the ashes are applied at modest rates (36Mg/ha) to the topsoil layers. © 2010 CSIRO.
dc.language eng
dc.language eng
dc.relation.hasversion Accepted manuscript version en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1071/SR10073
dc.title Boron contents and solubility in Australian fly ashes and its uptake by canola (Brassica napus L.) from the ash-amended soils
dc.title.alternative Boron uptake and distribution in canola grown on acidic soils amended with acidic and alkaline fly ashes en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dc.description.version Published
dc.parent Australian Journal of Soil Research
dc.parent Australian Journal of Soil Research
dc.journal.volume 5
dc.journal.volume 48
dc.journal.number 5 en_US
dc.publocation Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 480 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 487 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Environmental Sciences en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 0503 Soil Sciences
dc.for 0607 Plant Biology
dc.personcode 000006
dc.personcode 870360
dc.personcode 010046
dc.personcode 030005
dc.personcode 995955
dc.personcode 107343
dc.personcode 107130
dc.percentage 50 en_US
dc.classification.name Plant Biology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords boron toxicity
dc.description.keywords boron toxicity
dc.description.keywords soil boron
dc.description.keywords soil boron
dc.description.keywords soil pH
dc.description.keywords soil pH
dc.description.keywords trace elements
dc.description.keywords trace elements
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology/School of Civil and Environmental Engineering
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Science
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Environmental Science
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Environmental Science
utslib.copyright.status Open Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:23:47.074767+10
pubs.consider-herdc true
utslib.collection.history General (ID: 2)
utslib.collection.history School of the Environment (ID: 344)


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