Accounting for health-care outcomes: implications for intensive care unit practice and performance.

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dc.contributor.author Sorensen, R
dc.contributor.author Iedema, R
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-07T06:24:28Z
dc.date.issued 2010-08
dc.identifier.citation Health services management research : an official journal of the Association of University Programs in Health Administration / HSMC, AUPHA, 2010, 23 (3), pp. 97 - 102
dc.identifier.issn 0951-4848
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/13756
dc.description.abstract The aim of this study was to understand the environment of health care, and how clinicians and managers respond in terms of performance accountability. A qualitative method was used in a tertiary metropolitan teaching intensive care unit (ICU) in Sydney, Australia, including interviews with 15 clinical managers and focus groups with 29 nurses of differing experience. The study found that a managerial focus on abstract goals, such as budgets detracted from managing the core business of clinical work. Fractures were evident within clinical units, between clinical units and between clinical and managerial domains. These fractures reinforced the status quo where seemingly unconnected patient care activities were undertaken by loosely connected individual clinicians with personalized concepts of accountability. Managers must conceptualize health services as an interconnected entity within which self-directed teams negotiate and agree objectives, collect and review performance data and define collective practice. Organically developing regimens of care within and across specialist clinical units, such as in ICUs, directly impact upon health service performance and accountability.
dc.format Print
dc.language eng
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1258/hsmr.2009.009020
dc.title Accounting for health-care outcomes: implications for intensive care unit practice and performance.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent Health services management research : an official journal of the Association of University Programs in Health Administration / HSMC, AUPHA
dc.journal.volume 3
dc.journal.volume 23
dc.journal.number 3 en_US
dc.publocation London, UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 97 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 102 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 2001 Communication and Media Studies
dc.personcode 100638
dc.personcode 040083
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Communication and Media Studies en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords NA en_US
dc.description.keywords Humans
dc.description.keywords Focus Groups
dc.description.keywords Hospital Administration
dc.description.keywords Intensive Care Units
dc.description.keywords Hospitals, Teaching
dc.description.keywords New South Wales
dc.description.keywords Organizational Objectives
dc.description.keywords Personnel, Hospital
dc.description.keywords Quality of Health Care
dc.description.keywords Patient Care Team
dc.description.keywords Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Research in Learning and Change
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10
utslib.collection.history Closed (ID: 3)


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