Media and Male Identity

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dc.contributor.author Macnamara, J
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-21T05:53:26Z
dc.date.issued 2006-01
dc.identifier.citation 2006, 1
dc.identifier.isbn 978-0-230-00167-1
dc.identifier.other A1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/1631
dc.description.abstract A half-century of research has identified that mass media portrayals of women are influential in shaping their self-image and self-esteem, as well as men's and societies' views of women. Comparatively few studies have examined mass media portrayals of men and male identity, and gender studies have often assumed these to be unproblematic. But, in a post-industrial era of massive economic, technological and social change, research shows mass media are projecting and propagating new images of male identity from Atlas Syndrome workaholics and 'deadbeat dads' to 'metrosexuals' and men with "a feminine side" with potentially significant social implications.
dc.publisher Palgrave Macmillan
dc.title Media and Male Identity
dc.type Book
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation UK en_US
dc.publocation UK
dc.publocation UK
dc.identifier.startpage en_US
dc.identifier.endpage en_US
dc.cauo.name FASS.Communication & Learning Group en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 2001 Communication and Media Studies
dc.personcode 996876
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Communication and Media Studies en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition 1 en_US
dc.edition 1
dc.edition 1
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Creative Practices and the Cultural Economy


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