Australian military primary care practitioners do not believe clinical practice guidelines are needed for postdeployment medically unexplained symptoms.

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dc.contributor.author Adams, J
dc.contributor.author MacKenzie, A
dc.contributor.author McLaughlin, R
dc.contributor.author Burke, N
dc.contributor.author Bennett, S
dc.contributor.author Mobbs, R
dc.contributor.author Ellis, N
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-10T06:09:35Z
dc.date.issued 2009-04
dc.identifier.citation Military medicine, 2009, 174 (4), pp. 392 - 397
dc.identifier.issn 0026-4075
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/17065
dc.description.abstract In Australia, little research has been undertaken on the development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to assist with the impact of postdeployment ill-health including medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and it has been unclear whether such a development is desired by Australian primary care practitioners. In response an empirical investigation into the perceptions and experiences of 24 medical officers from the Australian military with regard to postdeployment ill-health, medically unexplained symptoms, and the potential development of CPGs in this area was undertaken. The analysis suggests that although MUS are accepted as common in general practice they are not perceived by practitioners to be as prevalent in the Australian Defense Forces. Although the medical officers do not perceive clinical practice guidelines as the best tool for managing MUS, there was interest in the development of practical tools to assist in the diagnosis of medically unexplained symptoms. The response by practitioners is of critical importance for the potential implementation of clinical practice guidelines in this area.
dc.format Print
dc.language eng
dc.title Australian military primary care practitioners do not believe clinical practice guidelines are needed for postdeployment medically unexplained symptoms.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent Military medicine
dc.journal.volume 4
dc.journal.volume 174
dc.journal.number 4 en_US
dc.publocation Bethesda en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 392 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 397 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 1117 Public Health and Health Services
dc.personcode 112076
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Public Health and Health Services en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity ISI:000278059600012 en_US
dc.description.keywords Humans
dc.description.keywords Focus Groups
dc.description.keywords Combat Disorders
dc.description.keywords Attitude of Health Personnel
dc.description.keywords Veterans
dc.description.keywords Adult
dc.description.keywords Practice Guidelines as Topic
dc.description.keywords Middle Aged
dc.description.keywords Primary Health Care
dc.description.keywords Guideline Adherence
dc.description.keywords Australia
dc.description.keywords Female
dc.description.keywords Male
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Health
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Health Services and Practice Research
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10
pubs.consider-herdc false
utslib.collection.history Uncategorised (ID: 363)
utslib.collection.history Closed (ID: 3)


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