Are the national guidelines for health behaviour appropriate for older Australians? Evidence from the Men, Women and Ageing project.

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Search OPUS


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author McLaughlin, D
dc.contributor.author Adams, J
dc.contributor.author Almeida, OP
dc.contributor.author Brown, W
dc.contributor.author Byles, J
dc.contributor.author Dobson, A
dc.contributor.author Flicker, L
dc.contributor.author Hankey, GJ
dc.contributor.author Jamrozik, K
dc.contributor.author McCaul, KA
dc.contributor.author Norman, PE
dc.contributor.author Pachana, NA
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:34:23Z
dc.date.issued 2011-10
dc.identifier.citation Australasian journal on ageing, 2011, 30 Suppl 2 pp. 13 - 16
dc.identifier.issn 1440-6381
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/18576
dc.description.abstract AIM: To review findings from the Men, Women and Ageing (MWA) longitudinal studies and consider their implications for national health guidelines. METHODS: Guidelines for good health for older adults in the areas of body mass index (BMI), physical activity, alcohol consumption and smoking behaviours are compared with MWA findings. RESULTS: Findings from MWA suggest that current BMI guidelines may be too narrow because BMI in the overweight range appears to be protective for both older men and women. Across all levels of BMI, even low levels of physical activity decrease mortality risk compared with being sedentary. Our findings suggest that consideration should be given to having different alcohol guidelines for older men and women and should include recommendations for alcohol-free days. The benefit of quitting smoking at any age is apparent for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Current national guidelines in the areas discussed in this paper should be reviewed for older people.
dc.format Print-Electronic
dc.language eng
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2010.00498.x
dc.title Are the national guidelines for health behaviour appropriate for older Australians? Evidence from the Men, Women and Ageing project.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent Australasian journal on ageing
dc.journal.volume 30 Suppl 2
dc.journal.number 2 en_US
dc.publocation Carlton South, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 13 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 16 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 110499 Complementary and Alternative Medicine Not Elsewhere Classified
dc.personcode 112076
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Complementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classified en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Humans
dc.description.keywords Exercise
dc.description.keywords Body Mass Index
dc.description.keywords Alcohol Drinking
dc.description.keywords Smoking
dc.description.keywords Health Behavior
dc.description.keywords Aged
dc.description.keywords Guidelines as Topic
dc.description.keywords Sex Factors
dc.description.keywords Australia
dc.description.keywords Female
dc.description.keywords Male
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Health
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Health Services and Practice Research
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10
pubs.consider-herdc false
utslib.collection.history Closed (ID: 3)


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record