Resolving the affordable housing conundrum in slack housing markets: the Sydney case

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dc.contributor.author MacDonald, HI
dc.contributor.editor Whitzman, C
dc.contributor.editor Fincher, R
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:36:48Z
dc.date.issued 2011-01
dc.identifier.citation State of Australian Cities National Conference 2011, 2011, pp. 1 - 11
dc.identifier.isbn 978-0-646-56805-8
dc.identifier.other E1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/19346
dc.description.abstract Sydney's metro-wide housing deficit is a barrier to the city's future growth, and its economic and social prosperity. The state's projections that the metropolitan area will grow from 4.2 million people in 2010 to 6 million in 2036 (NSW Department of Planning 2010) raise difficult questions about how the housing market will cope with this growth. Estimates put the 2009 NSW housing deficit at approximately 57,600 homes (National Housing Supply Council 2010). Future population growth will require an additional 770,000 new homes by 2036 (NSW Department of Planning 2010). Residential development has not kept pace with household growth, even given that households have grown less fast than we would expect based on population (average household size remains fairly high at 2.51) - a classic indicator of frustrated demand, reflecting households doubling up as a response to high housing prices. The housing deficit adds to the affordability problems faced by new market entrants, who must defer home purchase while saving for a deposit, or take on large mortgage debts. Continued affordability problems are likely to affect the availability of a skilled labour force, and thus dampen economic growth, in addition to the costs of the growing material inequality in a two-tier society made up of a landed gentry of property owners, and those trapped in escalating rental housing or who are indentured to high mortgage debts.
dc.format Scott McWhirter
dc.publisher SOAC
dc.title Resolving the affordable housing conundrum in slack housing markets: the Sydney case
dc.type Conference Proceeding
dc.parent State of Australian Cities National Conference 2011
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Melbourne en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 11 en_US
dc.cauo.name DAB.Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.conference State of Australian Cities SOAC Conference 2011
dc.for 1205 Urban and Regional Planning
dc.personcode 108598
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Urban and Regional Planning en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom State of Australian Cities SOAC Conference 2011 en_US
dc.date.activity 20111129 en_US
dc.date.activity 2011-11-29
dc.location.activity Melbourne, Australia en_US
dc.description.keywords affordable housing; housing markets; Sydney. en_US
dc.description.keywords Active vibration control
dc.description.keywords Building structure
dc.description.keywords Energy-to-peak control
dc.description.keywords Input delay
dc.description.keywords affordable housing
dc.description.keywords housing markets
dc.description.keywords Sydney.
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building/School of Built Environment
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Contemporary Design Practice
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10
utslib.collection.history School of Built Environment (ID: 332)
utslib.collection.history Closed (ID: 3)


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