Harvesting solar energy through natural or artificial photosynthesis: Scientific, social, political and economic implications

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dc.contributor.author Larkum, A
dc.contributor.editor Wydrzynski, TJ
dc.contributor.editor Hillier, W
dc.date.accessioned 2014-04-03T01:22:39Z
dc.date.issued 2012-01
dc.identifier.citation Molecular Solar Fuels, 2012, 1, pp. 1 - 19
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-84973-303-8
dc.identifier.other B1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/22796
dc.description.abstract Natural photosynthesis is an inherently inefficient process that developed millions or even billions of years ago. Thus present systems for harvesting solar energy in the form of organic carbon are inefficient compared with solar photovoltaic cells. The highest productivities are about 1% compared with ~10% for solar cells. Somewhat higher rates can be envisaged in the future but only through the use of a high solar footprint (the area of the Earth's surface needed to sustain a certain energy output), i.e. by using extra energy, which in a long-term sustainable world can come only from solar energy. While bioenergy production from algae may be lead to even greater efficiencies in the future it seems that this will only come about by an even higher solar footprint. Additionally, while bioenergy production may seem to be favourable in terms of carbon footprint, in practice there are several unfavourable outcomes. Further, bioenergy production immediately conflicts with use of the Earth's surface for food production and/or the need to maintain biodiversity. Thus artificial photosynthesis with very much higher expected efficiencies than natural photosynthesis is a worthwhile goal, in that it could potentially compete in efficiency with energy production by photovoltaic cells.
dc.publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
dc.title Harvesting solar energy through natural or artificial photosynthesis: Scientific, social, political and economic implications
dc.type Chapter
dc.parent Molecular Solar Fuels
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation United Kingdom en_US
dc.publocation United Kingdom
dc.publocation United Kingdom
dc.publocation United Kingdom
dc.publocation United Kingdom
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 19 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Plant Functional Biology & Climate Change en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 0501 Ecological Applications
dc.personcode 111269
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Ecological Applications en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition 1 en_US
dc.edition 1
dc.edition 1
dc.edition 1
dc.edition 1
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords en_US
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Science
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10


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