An agents establishes trust with equitable information revelation

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dc.contributor.author Debenham, John en_US
dc.contributor.author Simoff, Simeon en_US
dc.contributor.editor N/A en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-09T05:36:01Z
dc.date.available 2009-11-09T05:36:01Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier 2005001002 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Debenham John and Simoff Simeon 2005, 'An agents establishes trust with equitable information revelation', IEEE, PA, USA, pp. 66-74. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 078039447-X en_US
dc.identifier.other E1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/2609
dc.description.abstract Negotiation is an information exchange process as well as an offer exchange process. Theories of competitive negotiation are typically founded on game theory where the agent's utility function is the focus. If an agent is uncertain of the integrity of its information then it may not know its utility with certainty. Here what an agent knows and how certain it is of what it knows are modelled using tools from information theory that are applied to value information. An agent attempts to instil a sense trust in its opponent by revealing information of comparable 'value' in its responses to that which it has received. Each proposal and claim exchanged reveals valuable information about the sender's position. A negotiation may break down if an agent believes that its opponent is not playing fairly. The agent aims to give the impression of fair play by responding with comparable information revelation whilst playing strategically to influence its opponent's preferences with claims. The agent makes no assumptions about the internals of its opponent, including her motivations, logic, and whether she is conscious of a utility function en_US
dc.publisher IEEE en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MASSUR.2005.1507049 en_US
dc.title An agents establishes trust with equitable information revelation en_US
dc.parent Proceedings of 2005 IEEE 2Nd Symposium On Multi-Agent Security And Survivability en_US
dc.journal.volume en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation PA, USA en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 66 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 74 en_US
dc.cauo.name FEIT.School of Software en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.conference.location Philadelphia, PA, USA en_US
dc.for 080109 en_US
dc.personcode 723535 en_US
dc.personcode 000716 en_US
dc.percentage 60 en_US
dc.classification.name Pattern Recognition and Data Mining en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.custom IEEE Symposium on Multi-Agent Security and Survivability en_US
dc.date.activity 20050830 en_US
dc.location.activity Philadelphia, PA, USA en_US
dc.description.keywords modelling trust, maximum entrophy influence, argumentation, multi-agent system en_US
dc.staffid 000716 en_US


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