Ecosystem services: An ecophysiological examination

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dc.contributor.author Eamus, D
dc.contributor.author Macinnis-Ng, CMO
dc.contributor.author Hose, GC
dc.contributor.author Zeppel, MJB
dc.contributor.author Taylor, DT
dc.contributor.author Murray, BR
dc.date.accessioned 2009-12-21T02:30:02Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation Australian Journal of Botany, 2005, 53 (1), pp. 1 - 19
dc.identifier.citation Australian Journal of Botany, 2005, 53 (1), pp. 1 - 19
dc.identifier.issn 0067-1924
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/3739
dc.description.abstract This review aims to discuss ecosystem services, provide illustrative case studies at catchment and local scales and present future research needs. This review discusses the following: (1) Ecosystem services (ES) are those goods and services that are provided by or are attributes of ecosystems that benefit humans. Examples of ES include the timber derived from a forest, the prevention of soil and coastal erosion by vegetation and the amelioration of dryland salinity through prevention of rises in the water table by trees. The provision of ES globally is in decline because of a lack of awareness of the total economic value of ES in the public, policy and political fora. (2) Providing a scientific understanding of the relationships among ecosystem structure, function and provision of ES, plus determining actual economic value of ES, are the central challenges to environmental scientists (including triple-bottom-line economists). (3) Some ES are widely dispersed throughout many different ecosystems. Carbon accumulation in trees and the contribution of biodiversity to ES provision are two examples of highly dispersed attributes common to many ecosystems. In contrast, other ES are best considered within the context of a single defined ecosystem (although they may occur in other ecosystems too). Mangroves as 'nursery' sites for juvenile fish is one example. (4) Examples of catchment-scale and local-scale provision of ES are discussed, along with future research issues for the nexus between ES and environmental sciences. © CSIRO 2005.
dc.description.abstract This review aims to discuss ecosystem services, provide illustrative case studies at catchment and local scales and present future research needs. This review discusses the following: (1) Ecosystem services (ES) are those goods and services that are provided by or are attributes of ecosystems that benefit humans. Examples of ES include the timber derived from a forest, the prevention of soil and coastal erosion by vegetation and the amelioration of dryland salinity through prevention of rises in the water table by trees. The provision of ES globally is in decline because of a lack of awareness of the total economic value of ES in the public, policy and political fora. (2) Providing a scientific understanding of the relationships among ecosystem structure, function and provision of ES, plus determining actual economic value of ES, are the central challenges to environmental scientists (including triple-bottom-line economists). (3) Some ES are widely dispersed throughout many different ecosystems. Carbon accumulation in trees and the contribution of biodiversity to ES provision are two examples of highly dispersed attributes common to many ecosystems. In contrast, other ES are best considered within the context of a single defined ecosystem (although they may occur in other ecosystems too). Mangroves as 'nursery' sites for juvenile fish is one example. (4) Examples of catchment-scale and local-scale provision of ES are discussed, along with future research issues for the nexus between ES and environmental sciences. © CSIRO 2005.
dc.language eng
dc.language eng
dc.relation.hasversion Accepted manuscript version en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1071/BT04119
dc.title Ecosystem services: An ecophysiological examination
dc.title Ecosystem services: An ecophysiological examination
dc.type Journal Article
dc.description.version Published
dc.parent Australian Journal of Botany
dc.parent Australian Journal of Botany
dc.journal.volume 1
dc.journal.volume 53
dc.journal.number 1 en_US
dc.publocation Collingwood, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 19 en_US
dc.cauo.name DVCRch.Institute for Water & Environmental Resource Mgmnt en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 0607 Plant Biology
dc.personcode 000006
dc.personcode 010046
dc.personcode 980151
dc.personcode 034078
dc.personcode 980002
dc.personcode 040345
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Plant Biology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.custom 0.893 en_US
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Science
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - C3
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - C3
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:23:47.074767+10
pubs.consider-herdc true
utslib.collection.history School of the Environment (ID: 344)
utslib.collection.history General (ID: 2)


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