Who, where and why: situational and environmental factors contributing to patient falls in the hospital setting.

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dc.contributor.author Donoghue, J
dc.contributor.author Graham, J
dc.contributor.author Gibbs, J
dc.contributor.author Mitten-Lewis, S
dc.date.accessioned 2009-12-21T02:33:31Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association, 2003, 26 (3), pp. 79 - 87
dc.identifier.issn 0156-5788
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/4447
dc.description.abstract Falls are a significant burden on the Australian healthcare budget and can result in loss of personal independence, injury or death. A sustained high rate of inpatient falls at St George Hospital has made it imperative for nurses to identify those patients at highest risk in order to implement preventive interventions. Ninety-one inpatients fell over a ten-week period, with a total of 118 falls. Our study examined the prevalence of 'intrinsic high risk' characteristics identified in the literature in people who fell during hospitalisation. These results will be reported elsewhere. Extrinsic environmental factors contributing to falls were also identified, including time of fall, activity at time of fall and location of fall. This paper describes and discusses the study findings related to extrinsic risk factors.
dc.language eng
dc.title Who, where and why: situational and environmental factors contributing to patient falls in the hospital setting.
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent Australian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association
dc.journal.volume 3
dc.journal.volume 26
dc.journal.number 3 en_US
dc.publocation Deaking West, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 79 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 87 en_US
dc.cauo.name Clinical Nursing: Practices and Outcomes en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 1117 Public Health and Health Services
dc.for 1605 Policy and Administration
dc.personcode 840200
dc.percentage 50 en_US
dc.classification.name Policy and Administration en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Health
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10
pubs.consider-herdc true
utslib.collection.history Closed (ID: 3)


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