Anglo-multiculturalism: Contradictions in the politics of cultural diversity as risk

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dc.contributor.author Jakubowicz, AH
dc.date.accessioned 2009-12-21T02:38:29Z
dc.date.issued 2006-01
dc.identifier.citation International Journal of Media & Cultural Politics, 2006, 2 (3), pp. 249 - 266
dc.identifier.issn 1740-8296
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/5460
dc.description.abstract The continuing controversy over the place of multiculturalism within national political cultures has been highlighted by recent international policy debates. Nations with European, and especially Anglo-Celtic, roots have been forced into a major re-assessment of their strategies in relation to culturally diverse populations living within the nation-state. The dynamics underlying these tensions reflect fundamental fissures that global terrorism has exposed, sometimes instigating the portrayal of international rifts as confrontations of civilizations. Great Britain and Australia have long historic links, sharing many cultural orientations, the one of course the founder through invasion of the other. To some extent they have shared a commitment to policies of multiculturalism, which they saw as ways of reducing risks of social conflict in late modernity. They both now experience societal debates where multiculturalism has come under strong political critique ironically, for amplifying risk. Both societies have presented themselves to the international community as beacons of tolerance and diversity, as successful expressions of multiculturalism, and as examples of the power of the core values of Anglo-liberalism. Yet external audiences sometimes comment, and internal critics have persuasively argued, that such representations disguise systematic structures of racialized inequality masked by surface egalitarian discourses. As these contradictions become ever more apparent, we are thus directed towards a re-formulation of what a multicultural project would require if it is to demonstrate sufficient robustness to survive much into this century.
dc.publisher Intellect
dc.relation.isbasedon 10.1386/macp.2.3.249_1
dc.title Anglo-multiculturalism: Contradictions in the politics of cultural diversity as risk
dc.type Journal Article
dc.parent International Journal of Media & Cultural Politics
dc.journal.volume 3
dc.journal.volume 2
dc.journal.number 3 en_US
dc.publocation Bristol, UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 249 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 266 en_US
dc.cauo.name FASS.Cultural Studies Group en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 2001 Communication and Media Studies
dc.personcode 870330
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Communication and Media Studies en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.description.keywords Britain, Australia, multiculturalism, empire, risk society, ethnic groups en_US
dc.description.keywords Britain, Australia, multiculturalism, empire, risk society, ethnic groups
dc.description.keywords Britain, Australia, multiculturalism, empire, risk society, ethnic groups
dc.description.keywords Britain, Australia, multiculturalism, empire, risk society, ethnic groups
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Strength - Cosmopolitan Civil Societies
utslib.copyright.status Closed Access
utslib.copyright.date 2015-04-15 12:17:09.805752+10


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