Variation in musicians' experience of creating ensemble

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dc.contributor.author Reid, A
dc.contributor.author Petocz, P
dc.contributor.editor Jeanneret, N
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-18T06:55:10Z
dc.date.issued 2003-01
dc.identifier.citation Proceeding of the National Australian Association of Researchers in Music Education Conference, 2003, pp. 119 - 129
dc.identifier.isbn 0-9586086-3-6
dc.identifier.other E1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/7741
dc.publisher Asutralian Association of Researchers in Music Education AARME
dc.subject This paper described a researche methodology phenomenography and it application in investigating the experience of an ensemble the recorder consort Fortune in regotiating a shared conception of pieces of music being prepared for recording and performance. This methodology has been used previusly by Reid to inevstigate music teachers' and students' concpetions of music and work as a musician. This resulted in the identification of a Music Entity, a tripartite hierarchy of understanding, moving from extrinsic technical, with its focus on technical proficiency and an oreintation to correct, playing through extrinsic meaning, finding the meaning in the music, to intrinsic meaning, focusing on the development and communication of personal meanings through music. Further research by Reid, Petocz and co-researchers has shown the same tripartite conceptions of learning and working in a variety of other areas, design, statistics, theology, environment result in the inter-disciplinaty concept of the Professional Entity. Here, phenomenography is used to carry out an analysis of a small number of interviews with teh members of an ensemble focusing on the process of moving from indivual conceptions to a group conception of pieces of music, and trhen ensemble music as a whole. The analysis elucidates the process of negotiation between musicians in rehersal and shows that the Professional Entity, is apparent in ensemble as well as solo music. The results of the study have important pedagogical implications, enabling teachers to help students develop their conceptions ofmusic, while the methodology can be a useful tool for researchers in music education.
dc.subject This paper described a researche methodology phenomenography and it application in investigating the experience of an ensemble the recorder consort Fortune in regotiating a shared conception of pieces of music being prepared for recording and performance. This methodology has been used previusly by Reid to inevstigate music teachers' and students' concpetions of music and work as a musician. This resulted in the identification of a Music Entity, a tripartite hierarchy of understanding, moving from extrinsic technical, with its focus on technical proficiency and an oreintation to correct, playing through extrinsic meaning, finding the meaning in the music, to intrinsic meaning, focusing on the development and communication of personal meanings through music. Further research by Reid, Petocz and co-researchers has shown the same tripartite conceptions of learning and working in a variety of other areas, design, statistics, theology, environment result in the inter-disciplinaty concept of the Professional Entity. Here, phenomenography is used to carry out an analysis of a small number of interviews with teh members of an ensemble focusing on the process of moving from indivual conceptions to a group conception of pieces of music, and trhen ensemble music as a whole. The analysis elucidates the process of negotiation between musicians in rehersal and shows that the Professional Entity, is apparent in ensemble as well as solo music. The results of the study have important pedagogical implications, enabling teachers to help students develop their conceptions ofmusic, while the methodology can be a useful tool for researchers in music education.
dc.title Variation in musicians' experience of creating ensemble
dc.type Conference Proceeding
dc.parent Proceeding of the National Australian Association of Researchers in Music Education Conference
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Melbourne, Australia en_US
dc.publocation Melbourne, Australia
dc.identifier.startpage 119 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 129 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Mathematical Sciences en_US
dc.conference en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.conference National Asutralian Assocaition of Researchers in Music Education Conference
dc.conference.location Newcastle, Australia en_US
dc.for 190409 Musicology and Ethnomusicology
dc.personcode 0000020710 en_US
dc.personcode 860187 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Musicology and Ethnomusicology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.custom National Asutralian Assocaition of Researchers in Music Education Conference en_US
dc.date.activity 20030921 en_US
dc.date.activity 2003-09-21
dc.location.activity Newcastle, Australia en_US
dc.location.activity Newcastle, Australia
dc.description.keywords This paper described a researche methodology phenomenography and it application in investigating the experience of an ensemble the recorder consort Fortune in regotiating a shared conception of pieces of music being prepared for recording and performance. This methodology has been used previusly by Reid to inevstigate music teachers' and students' concpetions of music and work as a musician. This resulted in the identification of a Music Entity, a tripartite hierarchy of understanding, moving from extrinsic technical, with its focus on technical proficiency and an oreintation to correct, playing through extrinsic meaning, finding the meaning in the music, to intrinsic meaning, focusing on the development and communication of personal meanings through music. Further research by Reid, Petocz and co-researchers has shown the same tripartite conceptions of learning and working in a variety of other areas, design, statistics, theology, environment result in the inter-disciplinaty concept of the Professional Entity. Here, phenomenography is used to carry out an analysis of a small number of interviews with teh members of an ensemble focusing on the process of moving from indivual conceptions to a group conception of pieces of music, and trhen ensemble music as a whole. The analysis elucidates the process of negotiation between musicians in rehersal and shows that the Professional Entity, is apparent in ensemble as well as solo music. The results of the study have important pedagogical implications, enabling teachers to help students develop their conceptions ofmusic, while the methodology can be a useful tool for researchers in music education. en_US
dc.description.keywords This paper described a researche methodology phenomenography and it application in investigating the experience of an ensemble the recorder consort Fortune in regotiating a shared conception of pieces of music being prepared for recording and performance. This methodology has been used previusly by Reid to inevstigate music teachers' and students' concpetions of music and work as a musician. This resulted in the identification of a Music Entity, a tripartite hierarchy of understanding, moving from extrinsic technical, with its focus on technical proficiency and an oreintation to correct, playing through extrinsic meaning, finding the meaning in the music, to intrinsic meaning, focusing on the development and communication of personal meanings through music. Further research by Reid, Petocz and co-researchers has shown the same tripartite conceptions of learning and working in a variety of other areas, design, statistics, theology, environment result in the inter-disciplinaty concept of the Professional Entity. Here, phenomenography is used to carry out an analysis of a small number of interviews with teh members of an ensemble focusing on the process of moving from indivual conceptions to a group conception of pieces of music, and trhen ensemble music as a whole. The analysis elucidates the process of negotiation between musicians in rehersal and shows that the Professional Entity, is apparent in ensemble as well as solo music. The results of the study have important pedagogical implications, enabling teachers to help students develop their conceptions ofmusic, while the methodology can be a useful tool for researchers in music education.
dc.staffid 860187 en_US
pubs.embargo.period Not known
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney
pubs.organisational-group /University of Technology Sydney/Faculty of Science


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