Subjective distress associated with chronic stuttering.

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
Journal of fluency disorders, 2011, 36 (1), pp. 17 - 26
Issue Date:
2011-03
Full metadata record
Files in This Item:
Filename Description Size
1-s2.0-S0094730X10001075-main.pdfPublished Version110.77 kB
Adobe PDF
UNLABELLED: Stuttering is a chronic condition involving involuntary disruption to speech fluency. While elevated social anxiety has been found to be a risk factor for adults who have stuttered all their lives, it is unclear how stuttering influences other negative mood states such as interpersonal sensitivity and depressive mood. Consequently, controlled research was conducted that investigated negative affectivity across a number of domains in adults who stutter. Participants included 200 adults who have stuttered since childhood, with comparisons made to 200 non-stuttering controls of similar age and sex. The adults who stuttered were found to have significantly elevated levels of distress and negative mood states compared to the controls. As expected, significant differences were found for anxiety, however, significant and substantial differences were also found across a broad range of negative affect, including dimensions such as somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, depressive mood, hostility and paranoia. The implications of these findings for the better management of stuttering are discussed. EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The reader will be able to describe: (a) the negative impact of a chronic disorder like stuttering on people who have stuttered all their life; (b) the factor structure of the SCL-90-R; (c) the negative affectivity construct, and (d) the difference between psychogenic theories of stuttering and neurological theories of stuttering.
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: