Improving the solubility of nevirapine using A hydrotropy and mixed hydrotropy based solid dispersion approach.

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
Polim Med, 2017, 47 (2), pp. 83 - 90
Issue Date:
2017-07
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BACKGROUND: Nevirapine, an antiviral drug, is a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). It is used in combination with nucleoside analogues for treatment of HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection and AIDS. Nevirapine is a BCS class II drug which shows dissolution rate limited absorption. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present research was to provide a fast dissolving solid dispersion of nevirapine. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The solubility of nevirapine was initially determined individually in four hydrotropic agents - namely urea, lactose, citric acid and mannitol - at a concentration of 10, 20, 30 and 40% w/v solutions using purified water as a solvent. The highest solubility was obtained in the 40% citric acid solution. Then different combinations of 2 and 3 hydrotropic agents in different ratios were used to determine solubility, so that the total concentration of hydrotropic agents was always 40%. RESULTS: The highest solubility was obtained in a solution of lactose and citric acid at the optimum ratio of 15:25. This optimized combination was utilized in preparing solid dispersions by a common solvent technique using distilled water as a solvent. The solid dispersions were evaluated for XRD, DSC and FTIR to show no drug-hydrotrope interaction. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the concept of mixed hydrotropic solid dispersion is a safe, novel and cost-effective technique for enhancing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs by dissolving the drug in a nonionized form. The enhancement in solubility of nevirapine using hydrotropy is a clear indication of its potential to be used in the future for other poorly water-soluble drugs in which low bioavailability is a major concern.
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