Concentrated solar power hybrid plants, which technologies are best suited for hybridisation?

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
Renewable Energy, 2013, 57 pp. 520 - 532
Issue Date:
2013-09-01
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This assessment aims to identify the most suitable concentrated solar power (CSP) technologies to hybridize with Rankine cycle power plants using conventional fuels, such as gas and coal, as well as non-conventional fuels, namely biomass and waste materials. The results derive from quantitative data, such as literature, industry information and own calculations, as well as qualitative data from an expert workshop. To incorporate the variety of technology criteria, quantitative and qualitative data the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) is used as the multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) tool. Only CSP technologies able to directly or indirectly generate steam are compared in regards to feasibility, risk, environmental impact and Levelised Cost of Electricity (LCOE). Different sub-criteria are chosen to consider the most relevant aspects. The study focuses on the suitability of CSP technologies for hybridisation and results obtained are reality checked by comparison with plants already being built/under construction. The results of this assessment are time dependant and may change with new CSP technologies maturing and prices decreasing in the future.Key findings of this assessment show that Fresnel systems seem to be the best technology for feedwater preheating, cold reheat steam and <450 °C steam boost applications. Parabolic troughs using thermal oil rank second for all CSP integration scenarios with steam temperatures <380 °C. Generally, for steam temperatures above 450 °C the solar towers with direct steam generation score higher than solar towers using molten salt and the big dish technology. At and above 580 °C the big dish is the only alternative to directly provide high pressure steam.In addition to a general CSP technology selection for hybridisation the framework of this study could be used to identify the most suitable CSP technology for a specific CSP hybrid project but this requires detailed information for direct normal irradiance, climate conditions, space constraints etc to provide reliable results. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
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