Siberia

Citation:
Siberia, 2010
Issue Date:
2010-01
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Siberia is a first-hand account of a collision between the Siberian oil-gas frontier, a remote Indigenous community, and a film crew. The story of the film is told through hundreds of still photos taken in the early 1990s, shortly after reforms of glasnost and perestroika. Digital convergence has brought the relationship between the stillness of the photographic and the motion of the filmic to the fore. Research into the relationship between film and photography is a field of study that has seen considerable growth in the past few years, including Mulveys Death 24 x a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image (2006); Campanys Photography and Cinema (2008); and a collection of essays edited by Beckman and Ma, Still moving: between cinema and photography (2008). Siberia is new creative research into this field. It focuses on the still/moving in documentary in general, and the slide show and documentary, in particular. Siberia also forges new ground technically and artistically. The film was made using an innovative blend of analogue and digital technologies. Siberia poetic memoir voice is a break in style from the dominant traditions in documentary. It is part documentary, essay film and personal narrative. Its tone is more akin to a fable or tale than conventional observational documentary or reportage. Siberias originality and excellence is evidenced by its acceptance into over fifteen International festivals and film events. These include internationally renowned events at the Centre Georges Pompidou; the Oberhausen Festival, Germany; and the Edinburgh International Film Festival. In addition, Siberia has been invited to screen at international events in over 10 countries including the UK, Brazil, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain and Australia. Siberia was a finalist in the 2009 ATOM Awards (Australian Teachers of Media); and was also a finalist in the 2010 Australian Screen Sound Guild Awards.
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