A quality improvement intervention to address provider behaviour as it relates to utilisation of CA-MRSA guidelines.

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
Journal of clinical nursing, 2015, 24 (3-4), pp. 556 - 562
Issue Date:
2015-02
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To evaluate the impact of a provider focused quality improvement educational intervention on appropriate prescribing for community associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.Patient, provider and health system factors contribute to appropriate antibiotic prescription. Achieving appropriate prescribing is critical in decreasing the burden of antibiotic resistance. Knowledge of appropriate prescribing for community associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection is the first step in shifting prescriber behaviour to evidence-based recommendations.Quality Improvement Project.Following a review of best practice guidelines and application of the Stetler Research Utilization model, a brief educational intervention was delivered using voice over PowerPoint. Items in the educational intervention included indications for screening, particularly focusing on the role of watch and wait after culturing for simple abscesses. The intervention was delivered in a for-profit, nonacademic, urgent care setting, and assessed prescribing providers' knowledge and practice.Out of 48 medical doctor, physician assistant and nurse practitioner providers, 18 (37·5%) participated; 12 of the 18 (67%) participants showed an increase in knowledge. Forty three per cent of prescribers' charts demonstrated improved practice through use of the guidelines. Out of 18 prescribers, 44% sent a total of 21 cultures for abscesses. There was no difference in practice behaviours between professional groups.In spite of the increase in knowledge scores, this improvement in knowledge did not translate in dramatic change in practice, although trends in a positive direction were noted.This quality improvement project underscores the complexity of changing prescriber behaviour and the need for ongoing interventions.
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