The Home-Heart-Walk study, a self-administered walk test on perceived physical functioning, and self-care behaviour in people with stable chronic heart failure: A randomized controlled trial

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 2018, 17 (3), pp. 235 - 245
Issue Date:
2018-03-01
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© 2017, © The European Society of Cardiology 2017. Background: Adherence to self-care recommendations is associated with improved patient outcomes and improved quality of life for people living with heart failure. The Home-Heart-Walk (HHW) is an intervention to promote physical activity adapting the elements of a six minute walk test, a reliable and valid measure. This adaptation was designed to support self-monitoring of physical functioning and promote the self-care of people with heart failure. The primary outcome of the Home-Heart-Walk was perceived physical functioning and the secondary outcomes were six-minute walk test distance, health related quality of life, self-care behaviour, self-efficacy and physical activity level. Methods: A multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants (N=132) were recruited from three academic hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Participants were randomized to either the Home-Heart-Walk group or the control group. Perceived physical functioning, health related quality of life, self-care behaviour, exercise self-efficacy and physical activity level were measured at baseline and at three- and six-month follow-up. Results: After adjusting for baseline scores, there were no statistically significant between-group differences in perceived physical functioning, six-minute walk test distance, health related quality of life and exercise self-efficacy at follow-up. The intervention group had improvement in self-care behaviour (F(1,129) = 4.75, p = 0.031) and physical activity level (U = 1713, z = −2.12, p = 0.034) at the six-month follow-up compared with the control group. Conclusion: The Home-Heart-Walk did not improve the perceived physical functioning of the intervention group. Although the feasibility and acceptability of this strategy to support self-monitoring and improve self-care behaviour was demonstrated, self-reported adherence was unreliable; newer technologies may offer better assessment of adherence.
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