Globalisation as we enter the 21st century: reflections and directions for nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, 2003, 15 (3), pp. 162 - 174
Issue Date:
2003-01-01
Metrics:
Full metadata record
Files in This Item:
Filename Description Size
Thumbnail2009001482OK.pdf243.86 kB
Adobe PDF
The events of September 11th, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings of October 2002 are chastening examples of the entangled web of the religious, political, health, cultural and economic forces we experience living in a global community. To view these forces as independent, singular, linearly deterministic entities of globalisation is irrational and illogical. Understanding the concept of globalisation has significant implications not only for world health and international politics, but also the health of individuals. Depending on an individual's political stance and world-view, globalisation may be perceived as an emancipatory force, having the potential to bridge the chasm between rich and poor or, in stark contrast, the very essence of the divide. It is important that nurses appreciate that globalisation does not pertain solely to the realms of economic theory and world politics, but also that it impacts on our daily nursing practice and the welfare of our patients. Globalisation and the closer interactions of human activity that result, have implications for international governance, policy and theory development as well as nursing education, research and clinical practice. Nurses, individually and collectively, have the political power and social consciousness to influence the forces of globalisation to improve health for all. This paper defines and discusses globalisation in today's world and its implications for contemporary nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: