Plasmonic heating of gold nanoparticles and its exploitation

Publication Type:
Conference Proceeding
Citation:
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2005, 5649 (PART 2), pp. 565 - 573
Issue Date:
2005-06-15
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Nanoscale particles of metals such as gold can interact with light by means of a plasmon resonance, even though they are much smaller than the wavelengths of visible light. The proportions of light that are absorbed and scattered vary with wavelength. Any light that is absorbed will cause heating of the particles, and this effect may potentially be exploited for solar glazing coatings, nanoscale lithography or medical treatments. The position of maximum absorption of an isolated spherical nanoparticle is 518 nm, but this may be significantly red-shifted by means of decreasing the symmetry to an prolate spheroid or 'nanorod', or by producing a metal 'nanoshell' on a dielectric core, or by aggregating insulated spherical particles. Absorption peaks in the vicinity of 655 nm for aggregated particles and 780 nm for prolate spheroids are demonstrated here. Absorbed energy is released as heat into the environment of the particles, and will cause a temperature rise within the particle the magnitude of which depends upon the value of the effective heat transfer coefficient between particle and environment. The latter is not known, but we show how highly localized temperature rises of some tens of Celsius might be conceivable in systems illuminated by sunlight.
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