Genome-wide detection and analysis of homologous recombination among sequenced strains of Escherichia coli.

Publication Type:
Journal Article
Citation:
Genome biology, 2006, 7 (5), pp. R44 - ?
Issue Date:
2006-01
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BACKGROUND: Comparisons of complete bacterial genomes reveal evidence of lateral transfer of DNA across otherwise clonally diverging lineages. Some lateral transfer events result in acquisition of novel genomic segments and are easily detected through genome comparison. Other more subtle lateral transfers involve homologous recombination events that result in substitution of alleles within conserved genomic regions. This type of event is observed infrequently among distantly related organisms. It is reported to be more common within species, but the frequency has been difficult to quantify since the sequences under comparison tend to have relatively few polymorphic sites. RESULTS: Here we report a genome-wide assessment of homologous recombination among a collection of six complete Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri genome sequences. We construct a whole-genome multiple alignment and identify clusters of polymorphic sites that exhibit atypical patterns of nucleotide substitution using a random walk-based method. The analysis reveals one large segment (approximately 100 kb) and 186 smaller clusters of single base pair differences that suggest lateral exchange between lineages. These clusters include portions of 10% of the 3,100 genes conserved in six genomes. Statistical analysis of the functional roles of these genes reveals that several classes of genes are over-represented, including those involved in recombination, transport and motility. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that intraspecific recombination in E. coli is much more common than previously appreciated and may show a bias for certain types of genes. The described method provides high-specificity, conservative inference of past recombination events.
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